Categories
Real Estate

6 Challenges Multifamily Property Investors Face

A multifamily property is any residential property with more than one housing unit. Duplexes, townhouses, condominiums, and apartment complexes are all multifamily properties.

Investing in a multifamily property is one of the best ways to dip your toes in real estate and property management. That’s because multifamily properties offer many benefits, such as steady cash flow, lowered risk, passive income, tax benefits, and valuation potential.

Multifamily-Apartment

 

That said, like any other investment channel, it has its pitfalls. These are some of the challenges facing the real estate industry in 2021:

1. Management intensity

You do have the option of outsourcing management for a multifamily property. However, looking after such property is so intensive that it occasionally requires your personal intervention.

For instance, you will deal with multiple tenants, leases, maintenance jobs, tax issues, and even different payment options. Each tenant has a unique way of handling their lease and communicates differently.

Some tenants will treat the property with respect, while others will tear up the place, leaving you with hefty repair bills. You can avoid this by screening potential clients to ensure you lease the property to a responsible tenant.

Also, if one thing goes wrong in one unit, it will likely go wrong for other units as well. Such a situation translates to higher maintenance and repair bills.

Compare this to if you were dealing with a single-tenant leasing a 15,000 sq. ft. office space. Despite the size, it’s still just one tenant. Unlike residential properties, maintenance costs and obligations fall to the tenant and not the owner, making management less intensive.

On the flip side, dealing with a multifamily unit has its perks compared to managing separate single-family units. It is easy to hire one on- or off-site manager to oversee the complex with a multifamily property. Whereas with multiple rentals, you’d need several managers to do the same job.

2. Cost

It is an understatement to say the price for a multifamily property is hefty. In fact, this is one of the main challenges of property development. This causes many real estate investors to shy away from investing in this property type.

Investing in a multifamily property is also challenging for first-time investors who may not have the required amounts to make the down payment.

For example, a two-unit apartment in New York or San Francisco costs more than one million dollars. As an investor, banks will require you to raise at least 20% for a down payment. This amount translates to $200,000, which is an amount a new investor may not have.

The scenario is more challenging in a bull market because new investors compete against seasoned investors for the same property.

An advantage to this is that you are more likely to get approval for a multifamily unit loan rather than a single-family home. That’s because banks view multifamily properties as low risk.

If you are a first-time investor, you can qualify for an FHA loan if you opt to live in one unit within the multifamily property, as you rent out the rest. FHA loans require a small down payment compared to other loans.

If the rental income from the multifamily loan is enough to pay for the mortgage that means you will live rent-free. However, you might need to live at the property for at least one year for this to apply.

3. Competition

As mentioned, multifamily properties attract seasoned investors. The result is serious market competition, which shuts out budding investors.

Experienced investors have an advantage over the others as they can pay for these properties in cash. Moreover, they have the industry connections to effortlessly secure funding.

These investors are also more than willing to waive purchase contingencies like financing contingencies or paying for inspections. Combined, these factors make seasoned investors more appealing to sellers than new and inexperienced ones.

New investors should partner with experienced investors when they start investing in multifamily homes to stand a greater chance. The partnership offers an opportunity for a new investor to learn the ropes.

4. Regulations

Landlords for single-family units already deal with strict regulations, but they are worse for multifamily properties. Breaking any codes results in hefty fines and penalties.

Because of real estate issues during COVID, the federal government made some rules and regulations you must enforce, including social distancing rules to stop the pandemic.

Further, there are mandatory design standards, utility cost computation rules, and the federal government has regulations governing multifamily communities.

To avoid falling foul of these rules and regulations, ensure you research the federal and state laws and abide by them religiously.

5. Vacancies

It is not uncommon for multifamily properties to have vacancies for weeks or months at a time. If you are still paying a mortgage on the property, you will have to cover that cost on your own.

Renting out both sides of the complex ensures that you still have a rent collection of about 90%. With a single-family unit, months-long vacancies are costly and offer a collection rate of about 80%. If this continues for a couple of months, it will affect your overall profits.

6. Frequent Turnover

Generally, tenants in such properties are more temporary than other real estate types. Multifamily property tenants are typically first-time renters, and with time, they’ll want to move onto more family-friendly properties.

With an enlarged family, they’ll need a bigger space, a yard for their kids and dogs to play in, and a garage for their multiple cars.

Because of that, the average length for tenancy in a multifamily home is one-third of what you’d expect at a single-family property. So, if you’re looking for tenants to stay a little longer, a multifamily property is not the right fit for you.

You can also avoid having too many vacancies by offering a generally pleasant living experience.

Final word

You may be wondering if multifamily properties are the right real estate investment to try out. Like any other real estate investment, this type of property investment is lucrative. That said, it comes with its own set of cons, like any other type of real estate.

The most prevalent real estate challenges of 2021 you will face include hefty initial investment, high maintenance requirements, and frequent tenant turnover, forcing you to search for new tenants frequently.

That said, it’s up to you to decide whether to invest in them. When you address most of the challenges listed above, the multifamily property is one of the best investments.

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Podcast

How Time Is More Valuable Than Money And How To Use It To Negotiate With Dr. Gurpreet Padda

So the big tax question is this: how do wealthy people keep their money working for them when selling their business, real estate, or other highly-appreciated assets, without paying hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars in tax? What if we, as business and real estate owners who have poured blood, sweat, and tears to growing our wealth, and who didn’t hire expensive tax attorneys and CPAs to map out an exit strategy, knew their secrets? Instead of recreating the wheel, why can’t we just model the way they deferred 30 to 50% in tax, paid off debt, funded their next business stream, and most importantly, leave a financial legacy to give to the causes we believe in most? What if their secrets weren’t complicated at all, and you just need a guide who is a few steps ahead of you? That is the question, and this podcast will give you the answers. My name is Brett Swarts, and welcome to “Capital Gains Tax Solutions.” Welcome to the “Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast,” where we believe most high net worth individuals and those who help them, they struggle with capital gains tax deferral options, not having a clear plan is the enemy and using a proven tax deferral strategy, such as the deferred sales trust, or cost segregation, or 1031 exchange when it makes sense is the best way for you to grow your wealth. Hey, I’m your host Brett Swarts. In each episode, I am joined by some of the best real estate minds, financial minds and wealth minds in the world where they share their ideas, deal stories and inspiration. So together we can make complex tax deferral strategies simple and passive income plans achievable. I’m excited about our next guest, he’s a physician by trade, but he’s had real estate in his bones, in his blood since a young age of 14, he’s gonna share that part of his story, and he wants to… He’s on a mission to help create and preserve wealth for himself and his family and his partners, and also help people to understand real estate as a whole.

Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!

Here’s How »

Join the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Community today:

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Categories
Podcast

Discovering Multifamily- Passive Investing As A Full-Time MD With Gurpreet Padda

On this episode of Discovering Multifamily, Gupreet Padda joins us as the Founder of Red Pill Kapital and also a full-time physician. We discuss his experience all aspects of real estate investing, starting his remodeling company when he was just 14 years old and now how he helps his fellow doctors attain financial independence and practice medicine on their own terms.

Podcast Links:

ITunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/discovering-multifamily/id1506820688

Website: www.redknightproperties.com/media

YouTube: https://youtu.be/_eUjDlRNC68

Spotify: https://lnkd.in/gfcVc3p

Links/Shout-Outs Mentioned:

www.redknightproperties.com – Red Knight Properties Website

https://www.linkedin.com/in/gurpreet-padda – Gurpreet Padda LinkedIn

https://redpillkapital.com – Red Pill Kapital

Categories
Real Estate

CallumConnects Podcast – Gurpreet Padda

Gurpreet Padda – My biggest hurdle as an entrepreneur.

Welcome to “CallumConnects.” Five-minute entrepreneurial inspiration for your day. Joining us today on “CallumConnects” micro-podcast is Gurpreet Padda. Dr. Padda is a serial entrepreneur who started rehabbing houses and repairing diesel engines while in high school, before entering medical school at the age of 17. His secret power is his ADD and curiosity about how things work.

– A hurdle I’ve faced as an entrepreneur is also my greatest strength. I have horrendous ADD and I have shiny object syndrome, and I’ve had that ever since I can remember. I started a company when I was probably 14 years old while I was in high school. And I loved science but I loved taking things apart and I loved construction as well. So I ended up doing a construction company and then starting a company that fixed diesel engines, and I did this all while I was in high school. But I was so curious about anatomy and physiology that I went to medical school. I got into medical school when I was 17 and then I ended up graduating when I was, it was a six-year program, so I graduated when I was 22 or 23 years old. I’ve got an incredible curiosity about how things work and that often leads to a lot of nonsensical learning or appearingly nonsensical learning. So I end up getting curious about something and doing a deep dive and learning everything that there is to know about it and then I get distracted by my ADD, which says, hey, this is something interesting over here. And what that does is it allows me to learn and deep dive on things that appear non-related and then my ADD interrupts me and I end up jumping to another topic eventually. And often I’m able to reconnect a variety of different topics. So what I ended up learning from this is essentially use that superhero strength of ADD to learn and to move from topic to topic, but then use the overarching entrepreneurial mindset to give it application, to come up with a cohesive theory and a business model of how to get things done. One of the coolest books that I’ve ever read is “Who Not How.” And so I’ve been able to use some of those concepts more and more, which is not necessarily doing a deep dive into every single aspect of every single thing, but finding experts that already know that and engaging them, learning from them. And that way I’m not spending forever learning about a topic that I had no interest in. I ended up starting an entire restaurant company because I was curious about the food production system. I ended up with five restaurants before I knew it. And I was interested in fermentation and ended up starting a brewery. So this can really get out of control. And I’ve found that in order to channel that correctly and do it the right way, I have to be able to bring other people on board who will keep me in check. I have an amazing business partner that helps keep me in check. And I think that the ability to rely on others to kind of self-monitor our own behavior, that you trust these others, is really valuable. The ADD permits rapid reiteration of concepts. And it also allows you to abandon concepts that are less than ideal, but only within the context of getting assistance from other people. I don’t think that if I had other great people around me, I would be as successful.

– If you have enjoyed today’s show or got any value from today or previous episodes of “CallumConnects,” do please subscribe and leave a review. It means the world to our guests to be able to see what they’re sharing has led to your learning.

Categories
Real Estate

The Journey of a Physician and Real Estate Investor with Gurpreet Padda, MD

This week’s episode is the first in a two-part series that features Gurpreet Padda, MD. He is a private practice physician out of St. Louis, Missouri, who runs Reversing Diabetes MD and Padda Institute Center for Interventional Pain Management. Dr. Padda also runs Red Pill Kapital, which is a real estate investment development and management company. He is an advocate for educating private practice physicians on passive wealth strategies through owning real estate.

In this episode, we talk about…

[5:05] Getting into real estate as a teenager

[6:08] The desire to have a life outside of the hospital

[9:05] Characteristics that are more relevant than your education when it comes to owning a business

[10:30] The applicability of medical training to real estate

[11:09] How Dr. Padda decided on his medical specialty

[12:39] How capital flow impacts our health as well as the real estate market

[15:17] The importance of investing in real estate for your practice(s)

[16:31] How to decide where to purchase real estate for practice locations based on patient perspectives

[17:33] The effect of the pandemic on retail real estate

[21:28] Selling restaurants before the pandemic began

[24:14] Educating clinicians on creative passive cash flow and equity growth

[25:22] Why physicians tend to make financial decisions based on narcissism

Links to resources:

Reversing Diabetes MD: https://reversingdiabetes.com

Padda Institute Center for Interventional Pain Management: https://painmd.tv

Red Pill Kapital: https://redpillkapital.com

Categories
Real Estate

Dr. Gurpreet Padda: Creating Wealth with Real Estate for Healthcare Professionals

OVERVIEW:

Jason A. Duprat, Entrepreneur, Healthcare Practitioner and Host of the Healthcare Entrepreneur Academy podcast speaks with Dr. Gurpreet Padda, MD, MBA and entrepreneur. Dr. Padda is an avid real estate investor. He shares the lessons he has learned as an early entrepreneur and also provides tips for healthcare professionals interested in creating wealth through real estate investment.

EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:

Dr. Padda grew up in India during war and uncertainty. He moved to the US when he was 8 and started his first business at the age of 10 selling cards door-to-door. At 16, he had a team of 30-year-old men working for him. He states – I was an entrepreneur before I went into medicine. Dr. Padda made it through medical school by hustling, which he did through real estate auctions. During his first year of residency, Dr. Padda rehabbed an eight-unit building in Chicago. After his residency, he went into pediatric anesthesiology for heart, liver and lung transplants. His medical path also included addiction and interventional pain management. Dr. Padda’s practice has 7 locations and he provides $1.5 million in free care. “Option” is when you purchase a sale contract with an option to buy. You have three months to decide if you want to buy and the price is held at the same level. If you decide not to buy, you’re usually only out $100. Dr. Padda uses option contracts, where he’s looking at zoning and municipal plans. He researches what’s being planned for development in the area. Option contracts are low risk and offer a high reward. There are two types of wholesaling. “Ugly” includes houses below $80k requiring a lot of work. “Pretty” is when someone wants to sell and is having a hard time finding a buyer. This option provides great margins and it’s the one Dr. Padda recommends physicians to use. Dr. Padda also recommends going big with real estate vs buying single units. Cap rate is the net operating income divided by the price. Become a passive investor with somebody first, watch and learn from their mistakes, and then become an active investor. To get started in real estate investing, talk with people you know. Work referrals through friends and contacts. Don’t blindly trust people on the internet.

3 KEY POINTS:

The most valuable resource on earth is not money but time. You have to look at both active and passive methods of gaining wealth. Passive income is what people pay you while you’re sleeping. The biggest impediments to becoming wealthy are ourselves and our taxes. The number one impediment is our personal wealth operating system and how we think about money.

TWEETABLE QUOTES:

“Time is like a water hose and you’re watering a particular concept or project. The more water and fertilizer you apply to it, the better it grows.” – Dr. Gurpreet Padda

“I think entrepreneurship is the ability to ask questions of yourself, realizing you don’t know, and then trying to figure out the answer.” – Dr. Gurpreet Padda

“Leverage what you know.” – Dr. Gurpreet Padda

RESOURCES:

Red Pill Kapital: https://redpillkapital.com/

Dr. Gurpreet Padda’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gurpreet-padda

Michael Blank podcast: https://themichaelblank.com/podcasts/

Adam Adams podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/creative-real-estate-podcast/id1285094279

Categories
Real Estate

Section 8 Multifamily Ownership to Build Wealth

The Section 8 Housing Program offers financial assistance to access low-cost housing, sometimes referred to as the housing choice voucher program.

According to the latest figures, about 2.2 million households by low-income earners receive subsidized rent through the section 8 housing choice voucher program.

Since the government takes care of a large chunk of rent payment, the section 8 multifamily subsidized housing program has a massive advantage over traditional rental contracts. We examine how a shrewd property owner can tap into the program and build wealth.

What is the Section 8 Program?

Under the program, the government pays a percentage of the tenant’s rent directly to section 8 landlord whose property is in the listing.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Management (HUD) funds the program by paying, on average, 70% of a section 8 tenant’s rent and utility bills.

A family must typically earn under 50% of the median income in a given area to qualify for HUD Section 8 relief.

Section 8 Multifamily Home Ownership

Homeownership and maintenance under the program can involve financial support from the HUD. The owners can also access conditional government subsidies when renovating, building new homes, or putting up properties for a mortgage.

The homeowner must set aside units to house the low-income American population under the section 8 housing list.

Section 8 landlord application can be lengthy and costly, involving a lot of paperwork, a waiting period, and property inspection. It can take up to 5 months to get approval.

Multifamily homes are properties with up to4 units, and still qualify as a single residence from lending standards. These can be townhouses, duplexes, triplexes, or apartments with up to four units.  Five units and above are multifamily, but usually require a commercial mortgage.

Most multifamily dwelling property owners rent them out to residents. They are great for generating a higher monthly rental income with lower maintenance costs, so you can rely on property to build wealth over time.

Vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Program

Section 8 includes two types of vouchers for the tenants– The Housing Choice Voucher Program and the Project-Based Voucher.

The Housing Choice Voucher program allows tenants to choose any unit within the section 8 program.

The Project-Based Voucher ensures that the federal rental assistance stays within the selected housing unit and is often more profitable for the owner.

Advantages of Section 8 Multifamily Home Ownership

 

1. Easy Bank Financing

For real estate investors with a record of handling rental assets, the bank can use the projected rental income from the units to finance down payment programs for multifamily homeownership.

2. Certaintyof Rental Income

Upon qualifying for the Section 8 program, the HUD agrees with the property owner on the expected rental income, per the Fair Market Rate. The landlord will receive monthly payments from the government, even when there’s a recession.

3. Occasionally Higher Rental Rates

As an incentive, the government often includes an annual 5 to 8% incremental increase on rent payments. The rate could translate to a better deal than what they would get from the open market.

4. Increased Occupancy Rate

Qualified and listed property multifamily homeowners get access to a vast pool of would-be tenants on the waiting list. The list can have 2 million or more Americans at any given time. That means minimal vacancy issues, reducing your marketing budget significantly.

5. Stability of Rental Income

The federal subsidies make multifamily homes in the Section 8 program suitable for long-term tenancy, as the tenants are likely to stay longer in the units.

 

Building Wealth through section 8 Multifamily Home Ownership

Investing in several multifamily homes is a remarkable way to achieve long-term cumulative wealth. Here are some tips to consider when investing in section 8 multifamily homeownership:

a) Choose and manage tenants wisely

While renting out the multifamily units under Section 8, you pay off your mortgage from the tenants’ rent. Hence, liabilities go down, while in almost every instance, the property’s value goes up.

In this case, there comes a time when the mortgage is zero, and the income is primarily profit. Therefore, you can obtain more multifamily property, which you can scale to millions of dollars in wealth.

b) Ready Investors

The multifamily concept is more investor friendly as compared to single-family units. In this case, when you need financing, you bring the deal to the table while investors bring the money on board. Later, the profits get split as agreed.

c) House ‘hacking’

When you own a multifamily home, you can live in one of the units while renting out the rest. The tenants’ rent caters to your housing expenses, and you can save up over time.

d) Add more rooms

A sure-fire way to increase your rental income is to follow the BRRRR (buy, renovate, rent, refinance, repeat) strategy. Additionally, it would be best if you thought about increasing the number of rooms.

There’s a healthy market for multifamily homes with more than four bedrooms, but a chronic shortage for them:

Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Multifamily Properties: Opting In, Opting Out and Remaining Affordable.

For example, a single home will make you $150 in profit per month, but a duplex will rake in $300, while a four-unit multifamily will fetch $600 within the same timeframe.

Bottom Line

Scaling up wealth from multifamily units has a longer time horizon, is not entirely problem-free but is assured, especially when listed in the Section 8 program, whereby there is the assurance of monthly government payments.

It gets better over time as you can hire property managers to run it on your behalf, and you can adjust rental prices upwards after periodic renovations.

 

Categories
Real Estate

About Physician Retirement

A retirement savings plan is supposed to help you retire, but the problem is you’re still working and your money is retired.

Real estate is the most powerful way to accumulate wealth. More people have become millionaires through real estate than any other means. We know how to find the property, create a plan for improving the cash flow, negotiate the deal, and manage the asset. Your passive investment provides you with the opportunity to earn an income without the nine to five. We create a unique business strategy that fits your financial and investment goals. Get the financial freedom you need to do more of what you love. We are Red Pill Kapital, with a K.

About retirement

Close to two-thirds of seniors cite finances as the primary reason why they remain at work, according to Provision Living, which is a provider of senior living communities. That means that the vast majority of people when they approach retirement age are unable to retire.

How long will your money last you in retirement, especially when you consider that one year of nursing home care in a semi-private room is projected to be $128,000
a year in 2021?

A 65-year-old couple retiring in 2019 can expect to spend $285,000 on health care costs in retirement alone. A working senior only has an average of $133,000 in retirement. How long will your money
last? Even if you’re a super-wealthy physician, have you anticipated an additional $285,000 in medical expenses? Have you anticipated $128,000 a year for the next 10, 15, or 20 years if you have to go into a nursing home facility?

You may think that the standard recommendations of putting 15 percent of your paycheck towards a retirement plan were impossible to achieve.

Even if you want to live on just half of your final salary, you need to put in about 40 percent of your income. This is dramatically different than what most people anticipate, and this assumes a historical return rate of eight to 10 percent, and I’m going to tell you that the future return rates on most traditional portfolios are going to be well below eight to 10 percent. They’ll probably be between six or seven percent, and when you take out inflation, and taxes, and everything else, your net rates of return are going to be two to three percent, so that’s going to have a dramatic impact on your retirement growth plan.

Future stock market returns will not match the historical returns.

The reality is the historical returns are eight to 10 percent. We expect the future to be six percent. When you take out the one to two percent in portfolio management or asset management fees, and you take out the two and a half percent, also, for inflation, you end up with essentially about a two to three percent rate of return. That’s not enough to sustain yourself long-term on a passive income
alone. It would just be setting aside a lump sum of money, and just eating through that at a very low rate.

If you bring in somebody who knows what they’re doing, it dramatically increases the likelihood of your success. You would call in a specialist if you had a pulmonary disease; you would call in a cardiologist if you had somebody with an unusual cardiac dysfunction that you couldn’t quite figure out. You would call in a neurosurgeon if you had somebody with a glioblastoma – so call in a specialist, call in somebody to help you navigate this. But, be careful who your specialist is, because usually the specialist that you call in is selling their plan, and it’s selling what they do really, really well, and what they make most of their money on.

If you do call in a specialist, you will get a more formalized retirement investment plan in place.

Almost half of the people that do that get a formal plan out of it. It’s really important to understand what your expenses are going to be, what your income is going to be and to analyze it before you get there. This is not a set and forget it. This isn’t an, “Oh, I’m going to have this, and I’ll be okay.” This is not something that you can make a change then. Your “then” has to be “now,” and you have to be able to predict where you’re going to be 30 years from now.

What does this have to do with physicians?

I mean, physicians have money. Why is it that it’s so relevant? The problem is that most physicians are active-wage employees, and most of them would invest most of their assets in the stock market, or they invest their assets in employer-sponsored retirement plans, which invest in
the stock market. These paper assets are precisely the things that are most damaged and most volatile, and the things that are consumed by assets under management fees. Most physicians rely on professional advice, but their investment options are limited to the financial instrument offered by their plan or their advisor.

What happens is they get this false sense of security, and that false sense of security makes them think that they’re going to be okay until they get to retirement, and by then it’s too late to make a change. There was an AMA study done in 2018, and they asked retired physicians: Do you feel
comfortable? Over half of them were worried about volatile market conditions depleting their savings. 40 percent of them felt like they hadn’t saved
enough, 28 percent said that they started saving too late, and about a third of them realized that their medical expenses were going to be out of control. Nearly three-quarters of all physicians were under duress by the time that they retired, which is almost exactly the same number that’s in the general population of non-physicians.

Physician salaries and income may be high, but their expenses are also high. Physicians’ hyperspecialization in medicine has kept them from understanding the financial world, and that lack of understanding is going to have a huge impact on physician retirement and financial stability.

We went to medical school to care for and improve humanity

We assume that by doing good for others, we would do well for ourselves. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Those financial rules have changed. We have to adapt to this new world – or we’ll die extremely highly educated but broke.

About me

I’m Gurpreet Padda. I’m a physician. I also have an MBA. I’m board-certified in anesthesia. I’m board-certified in interventional pain, and I’m board-certified in addiction, so I have a lot of experience in the medical field. I graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 1988. I’ve been in both an academic and private practice. I’ve been at a hospital-based practice, and I’ve been in independent medical practice as well. I’ve used insurance-based plans, and I also have a cash-pay practice when we deal with issues associated with cosmetic surgery. I’ve run 11 outpatient clinics. I’ve developed surgery centers for myself, and I’ve developed surgery centers for other people. I have both a medical and a non-medical turnaround specialty.

I started in the medical field after I started in the business world. That doesn’t mean I started a lot later. I started in the business world when I was 16, and
I didn’t go to medical school—a six-year program—until I was almost 18. I’m driven by compliance. I want to figure out what the rules are and I want to make sure I don’t violate those rules, so that’s my personality. That’s how I come to this.

Is Red Pill Kapital right for you?

Are you looking to enhance your financial wealth and truly live the life that you deserve? Are you an accredited investor who’s interested in learning more about passively investing and cash-flowing
commercial real estate? Are you interested in investing alongside us? Because we don’t need your money. What we’re trying to do is do bigger projects with more leverage, and the bigger the project, the less the risk because the leverage improves. We only make money if you make money. If you have any questions, please email me at info@redpillkapital.com and that’s Kapital with a K.

What’s Red Pill Kapital?

Red Pill Kapital is a physician-owned commercial real estate investment and education company. It allows you to invest passively alongside us. We find the property, or we find the investment group. We create and validate their plan. We look at how to improve the cash flow, we negotiate the deal, and we manage and oversee the asset. Your passive investment provides you with an opportunity to earn an income without the 9 to 9 because physicians don’t work 9 to 5. We probably work 6 to 9.

We create a unique business strategy that fits your financial investment goals because we understand the specific needs of physician professionals. I
specialize in turnaround situations. I originally got my MBA in finance, because I was interested in pharmacoeconomics studies, but then, I was applying
those principles – the cost-benefit analytic tools and cost-utility studies – and helping determine rates of return for healthcare. I started applying them to physician care. I had already started my first company when I was at the age of 14, and it was a construction company. I went to medical school and started right before my 17th birthday – I turned 18 in November, and I had started right before. My first year was really when I was 18, and it was a six-year program, so it was combined.

The reality is that early exposure to construction, and dealing with people when I was 14, 15, 16, and then, understanding how the dynamics of human beings are, has made a huge difference, and it’s allowed me to look at things in a little bit different way. I’ve eventually gone on to develop about 2 million square feet of commercial real estate. I’ve owned and operated five restaurants. I’ve got over 30 companies that I’ve worked in as in terms of ownership, and currently, have managed assets of more than $200 million, but I still practice clinically every single day. I practice because I want to practice.
I practice because I love the patients that I take care of. I practice in the urban core, and most of my patients are indigent. Most of my patients are on Medicaid, and I do my medical practice because it’s my calling, but my money is made outside of medicine.

We search for value-added real estate for our passive commercial real estate partners, and we actively manage that investment long-term for a successful exit. We are Red Pill Kapital.
Find us at Redpillkapital.com

Categories
Real Estate

Nine reasons to invest passively in somebody else’s commercial real estate deal

We’ve done over 2 million square feet of commercial real estate development in our company directly, so why on earth would we ever invest passively in somebody else’s deals?

Real estate is the most powerful way to accumulate wealth. More people have become millionaires through real estate than any other means. We know how to find the property, create a plan for improving the cash flow, negotiate the deal, and manage the asset. Your passive investment provides you with the opportunity to earn an income without the nine to five. We create a unique business strategy that fits your financial and investment goals. Get the financial freedom you need to do more of what you love. We are Red Pill Kapital, with a K.

About me

I’m Gurpreet Padda. I’m a physician. I also have an MBA. I’m board-certified in anesthesia. I’m board-certified in interventional pain, and I’m board-certified in addiction, so I have a lot of experience in the medical field. I graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City in 1988. I’ve been in both an academic and private practice. I’ve been at a hospital-based practice, and I’ve been in independent medical practice as well. I’ve used insurance-based plans, and I also have a cash-pay practice when we deal with issues associated with cosmetic surgery. I’ve run 11 outpatient clinics. I’ve developed surgery centers for myself, and I’ve developed surgery centers for other people. I have both a medical and a non-medical turnaround specialty.

I started in the medical field after I started in the business world. That doesn’t mean I started a lot later. I started in the business world when I was 16, and I didn’t go to medical school—a six-year program—until I was almost 18. I’m driven by compliance. I want to figure out what the rules are and I want to make sure I don’t violate those rules, so that’s my personality. That’s how I come to this.

I specialize in turnaround situations

I originally got my MBA in finance because I was interested in pharmacoeconomic studies, but then I was applying those principles — the cost-benefit analysis, analytic tools and costs, utility studies, and helping determine rates of return — for healthcare. I started applying them to physician care. I had already started my first company at the age of 14, a construction company, and I went to medical school right before my 17th birthday. I turned 18 in November and I had started right before, so my first year was really when I was 18, and it was a six-year program, so it was combined. The reality is that early exposure to construction and dealing with people when I was 14, 15, 16, and then understanding how the dynamics of human beings are, has made a huge difference, and it’s allowed me to look at things in a little bit different way.

I’ve eventually gone on to develop about 2 million square feet of commercial real estate. I’ve owned and operated five restaurants. I’ve got over 30 companies that I’ve worked in, as in terms of ownership, and currently have managed assets greater than $200 million, but I still practice clinically every single day. I practice because I want to practice. I practice because I love the patients that I take care of. I practice in the urban core and most of my patients are indigent. Most of my patients are on Medicaid, and I do my medical practice because it’s my calling, but my money is made outside of medicine.

I have personally owned and operated apartment buildings and several hundred units of owned and operated mobile home parks. I’ve owned and operated restaurants, mixed-use developments, medical office buildings, surgical centers, industrial warehouse spaces, office buildings, and retail strip centers. I have a lot of experience in real estate, which gives me the opportunity to have made a lot of mistakes. The reality is you only learn when you make mistakes. If I’m dealing with somebody and I’m going to invest passively with them, I want to know what mistakes they’ve made, because if they’ve never made a mistake, there’s going to be a problem. I don’t know how they’re going to react.

On directly owning and operating real estate

There are some issues and advantages to investing passively

Advantages
• Quick, immediate decisions
• Control
• Leverage bank money 5:1 ratio
• Tax-advantaged accelerated depreciation
• Pride of ownership
• High yield and appreciation

Disadvantages

• Too quick, and too immediate
• Control = Responsibility
• (Tenants, Toilets, Termites)
• Recourse loans, eventually you run out of down payments
• Inability to qualify as a qualified real estate professional
• Predators know what you own
• Forced to use 1031 with an ever-increasing deal size


These are nine reasons to invest passively in somebody else’s deal instead of actively doing it on your own

When you’re investing passively, you don’t have to be an expert at that asset type. You don’t have to be the expert at that asset class. You don’t have to be the expert at that specific demographic because you have to realize that real estate is hyper-local. It’s blocked to block. It’s road to road. It’s not stated to state. It’s not even the United States. You don’t invest in the U.S. You invest in the U.S., in a state, in a city, in a neighborhood, on a particular side of the street.

1. Don’t need to be the expert

It’s very hyper-local. You don’t have to develop all of the expert lender environment relationships because these lenders are very finicky and you have to be in constant contact with them. You don’t have to develop expert relationships with brokers, which takes a lot of friction. You don’t have to take them out to lunch. You don’t have to hang out with them and have a drink. You don’t have to constantly contact them so that you’re getting a good deal because the reality is most commercial real estate is driven by broker relationships and you have to maintain those broker relationships.


2. Non- recourse, not on loan

When you invest passively, it’s a nonrecourse loan to you. You’re not on the loan.

You don’t have any risk beyond your capital invested.

You’re passive. Who is at risk is your general partnership, and they’re heavily invested in doing the right thing because they’re the ones at the highest risk. You’re along for the ride. You can step off this bus any time you want.

3. No responsibility except to vet the deal, the operator, and monitor

You don’t really have any responsibility inside the deal except to vet the deal. You need to vet the deal. You need to vet the operator and you need to monitor the deal. We’ll have other presentations on how to vet the deal, but you want to look closely at the underwriting. You want to look at the debt service coverage ratio. You want to look at the rates of return. You want to look at how long it’s going to take to get that return. You want the underwriter to have stress-tested that deal.

• What happens if this drops to a historic vacancy level?

• What happens if interest rates go up?

• What happens if demographics change for this community?

When you do vet the operator, you want to check their backgrounds. Every single general partner, you want to have checked their backgrounds. You want to look at their prior deal experience; you want to run UCCs on them. You may even want to do criminal and legal background checks on them.

That’s what we do. We’re Red Pill Kapital. We look at those deal sponsors. We figure out if we’re going to invest passively, and I want to know everything about the operator.

The operator is the most important part of a particular deal. It’s even more important than the deal itself.

4. No time commitment

When you’re passive, you don’t have a time commitment because what you’re doing is you’re using other people’s time and paying for it with your dollars. It’s the concept of leverage. Now, most people talk about other people’s money, but as a physician you have money. What you don’t have is time, and the reality is time is always way more valuable than money. If you can leverage other people’s time with your money, you’ve created far greater leverage than the five to one ratio of money leverage that you would create in a recourse loan.

5. Not limited by geography or travel distance or time zone

When you’re investing passively, you’re not limited by geography. You’re not limited by travel distance. You’re not limited by time zone. You can do geographic arbitrage. You can live in one place and pay rent and then invest in another place and earn a high income.

There are some people that want to live in California, but they invest in Oklahoma. They don’t want to live in Oklahoma. There are some people that live in Florida and they don’t think that Florida is a great place for them to invest long-term because of the hurricanes – even though I have to tell you the hurricanes are not as big of a deal right now. Now they might become
a big deal in 10 years, but they want to invest somewhere else. Geographic arbitrage is what passive investment allows you to do. You don’t have to go drive by your property every single day. You don’t have to go look at it. You don’t have to manage that asset directly. You’re passive. You live where you want to live and rent if you want to rent, but you invest where it makes money.

6. Bigger projects, more eyes on the project, professional management

The other reality is in a passive deal, it’s going to be a lot bigger than you doing a small deal. The bigger the project, the more eyes on the project. There’s more professional management and the reality is it’s going to have to get a loan and the bankers are as interested or more interested than you are because you’re leveraging a five to one ratio. The general partners are on the hook, and the bank wants to make sure that this is an awesome deal because they want their money back. They’re going to stress-test this deal.


You know, if it’s a gigantic deal, you’re going to have a full-time leasing agent. You’re going to have full-time maintenance. You’re going to have supplies in stock. You’re not going to have trip charges because you own one house on this side of the street and one house five blocks away and then one house three miles away. In a passive deal like this, you’re going to own 200 units
or 150 units and it’s all going to be in a one-acre plot of land or a two-acre plot of land, and it’s right here and all the systems are exactly the same. All the HVACs use the same filters. All of the plumbing is the same. You need to replace a toilet; you have six of them in stock. Your maintenance guy knows how to do this. You have full-time management, you have full-time
maintenance and you have full-time leasing capacity, so your turnovers don’t cost as much. Trip charges are gone when everything is in one commonplace.

7. Deploy capital at a higher rate of return in an asset type that you can affect and impact

You want to deploy capital at a higher rate of return and asset type that you can affect an impact.

The reality is when you deploy capital in the stock market, I don’t care how many iPhones you buy, you’re not going to affect the price of Apple.

When you deploy capital in a property and you have an interest in it and you get on those property management calls and you can give some feedback, if you’re interested, it’ll have a huge impact. It’ll have a huge impact on the operations of the project and you can have a very significant outcome difference.

8. Can use IRA money, since I don’t control

You can’t use your IRA money if you own the deal because you’re self-enriching. But if you’re a passive investor alongside somebody else who’s the general partner, we can show you how to use your IRA money.

• You’re not a prohibited party in a passive deal.
• You don’t have any issues with 1031s because if you’ve structured this correctly and you’ve structured your taxes, you’re not going to have any issues.

There are a lot of issues associated with capital gains. There are a lot of issues associated with taxes if you use your IRA, and navigating that can be a very significant factor. So let’s take an example: let’s
say that you’re investing through your IRA and you get $100,000 gain. It’s all good until you realize that you might be at risk for 37 percent UDFI tax if that project had a loan on it.

But if you structure this correctly, you can prevent that by using a qualified retirement plan. So you shift your IRA to a QRP, and the QRP is immune from those taxes. Let’s say that instead you had purchased this with non-IRA money and you sell it and you got $100,000 gain. Well, you’re going to be subject to a tax on that money because it’s capital gain. Using the right plan at the right moment, with the right stuff, will prevent you from having to pay taxes, and taxes are your biggest impediment to wealth generation.

9. Pride of ownership, without the predators

You get the pride of ownership without the predators. The government can’t go after you. The tax authorities leave you alone. The attorneys, the patients, the employees, and all of the predatorial problems that you have disappear when you’re passive, and you can hide your passivity even further by buying it through a trust. There are all kinds of tools that you can do to protect yourself as a passive that are not available to you as an active investor. Your name is not on the loan. Your name is not in the public record.

So what’s Red Pill Kapital?

Red Pill Kapital is a physician-owned commercial real estate investment and education company. It allows you to invest passively alongside us. We find the property or we find the investment group. We create and validate their plan. We look at how to improve the cash flow. We negotiate the deal. We manage and oversee the asset. Your passive investment provides you with an opportunity to earn an income without the nine to five because physicians don’t work nine to five; we probably work six to nine. We create a unique business strategy that fits your financial investment goals because we understand the specific needs of physician professionals.

Is Red Pill Kapital right for you?

Are you looking to enhance your financial wealth and truly live the life that you deserve? Are you an accredited investor who’s interested in learning more about passively investing and cash flowing
commercial real estate? Are you interested in investing alongside us? Because we don’t need your money. What we’re trying to do is do bigger projects with more leverage, and the bigger the project, the less the risk because the leverage improves. We only make money if you make money.

If you have any questions, please email me at info@redpillkapital.com and that’s Kapital with a K.

We search for value-added real estate for our passive commercial real estate partners, and we actively manage that investment long-term for a successful exit. We are Red Pill Kapital.
Find us at www.redpillkapital.com

Categories
Real Estate

What is a Cap Rate?

Today, I’m going to talk a little bit about cap rates. I think that cap rates are very important for professionals to understand and frequently they’re misinterpreted. I want to spend a few minutes going over what cap rates are, what they actually mean, and how do you best utilize them.

Real estate is the most powerful way to accumulate wealth. More people have become millionaires through real estate than any other means. We know how to find the property, create a plan for improving the cash flow, negotiate the deal, and manage the asset. Your passive investment provides you with the opportunity to earn an income without the nine to five. We create a unique business strategy that fits your financial and investment goals. Get the financial freedom you need to do more of what you love. We are Red Pill Kapital, with a K.

Risk and reward: the greater the risk, the greater the opportunity for reward.

In real estate, one of the most important things that you can figure out is how do you define what something is worth. I think that this is one of the most important formulas in real estate, so I’m going to spend a few minutes on it. It is essentially net operating income divided by the value equals the cap rate. The cap rate is inherent and specific to different asset types, different locations, different quality of asset, whether it’s an A, B or C type location, whether it’s a major metropolitan area, or whether it’s rural.

What is the asset?

Is it an industrial building? Is it a farmhouse? Is it farm rental land? Is it a multi-family apartment unit? There’s an inherent cap rate that we measure one asset against another and this is a different way to look at risk than just reward and having a generalized principle, and we do that through cap rate. If something has a 10 cap or a 10 percent cap rate, that’s going to have a different value than something that has a five cap. Let’s go over that net.

Net operating income is equal to income minus expenses. You take all of the income, you take all the expenses away, and that’s what you’re left with. For example, if an investment property has $50,000 of net income before you look at any debt service, you have $50,000 of net income and its value in the market is a million dollars. That means that its inherent cap rate is 5 percent.

Now let’s take a look at it a different way; let’s play with the formula. Let’s say that I want to figure out what the value would be if I changed my net operating income. What would the value be? What would be the value in a different market if my net operating income was higher, but I was able to buy it for the same amount of money? Let’s take that example. Let’s say that I went to a different market and the thing was generating $80,000 as opposed to $50,000, but I was only having to pay a million dollars. In both situations, the value’s the same.

One cap rate, the first one where I was generating $50,000, is a cap rate of 5 percent. Where I’m generating $80,000 in net operating income, my cap rate is now 8 percent. That’s a 3 percent difference in cap rate and that can be very substantial. It can tell you a lot about the demographics. The higher the cap rate, the higher the perceived risk for that asset group by people that are far smarter than you and I.

It’s a summary total. It’s people that have already invested in this kind of asset class, in this kind of city, and they’ve kind of sat down and said, «Hey, this is what I am willing to pay.» “Well, this is what I’m willing to pay.” You and I have probably done a few real estate transactions, but this is the summarization of 10,000, 20,000, or 50,000 real estate transactions of that asset group, of that asset type in that community with that demographic.

The cap rate is an easy way to compare different rates of return. It also can have the formula manipulated so that if you know the cap rate, you change the net operating income. You haven’t changed the property—it’s the same property—so the cap rate stays the same, but you change your net operating income. What happens to the value?

Cap Rate: comparison of net income for the same dollar investment between different investments

Cap rates allow you to compare what you do with net income for the same dollar investment between two different investments, whether they’re the same class of investment like, for example, multi-family compared to another multi-family or the same class of investment such as a retail shopping center compared to another retail shopping center or comparing between classes of investment, comparing a multi-family to a commercial office building.

Cap rate says this is my net operating income for this dollar invested. Cap rate is a comparison of net income for the same dollar invested between two different investments. An example is, if I have $1,000 invested and I get $100 of net operating income per year, that gives me a cap rate of 10 percent.
Another example would be that I get an $80,000 return for an $800,000 investment, and that’s a cap rate of 10 percent. Let’s say that I get a $90,000 return for an investment of $800,000; that’s an 11.25 percent cap. If you go further and you get a $60,000 return, which is less, for the same $800,000 investment, your cap rate is 7.5 percent.

or, a comparison of value-driven by NOI

If you look at it a different way, if you take the cap rate formula and you take the net operating income and divide it by the cap rate, you end up with a presumed value, and this is very relevant because this is how frequently brokers discuss what a particular value is. They’ll say, «Oh, this is an eight cap and its net operating income is X, Y, Z, and therefore its value must be Y.» This is a value derivative and this becomes very, very important when you’re starting to talk to people and ask them, «What’s your cap rate? What’s your net operating income?» That’ll give you what the presumed value is but this can also be very, very confusing and we’ll go through that in a few minutes.

Given a Cap Rate of 5%

Let’s give you an example. Let’s say that you know what the cap rate is for the area, for this kind of property. It’s about 5 percent and you know what the net operating income is, it’s $100,000, so what’s the value of that property? Well, if you’re paying more than two million dollars, you’re an idiot because based upon cap rate it should be two million dollars. Now, that’s what it should be and there’s some manipulations that you can do to that but that’s, in essence, assuming all things equal, a five cap with
$100,000 of net operating income should give you a translated value of $2 million.


∆ NOI and ∆ Value

Let’s say that you change your net operating income slightly — $10 per unit per month for 100 units. You go up 10 bucks, which doesn’t seem like a lot, but you do it for 100 units and there are 12 months in a year, so you get a $12,000 increase in your net operating income. On that five cap, you changed your value by $240,000, which is a very significant portion of your purchase price, so a small subtle change creates a huge leverage effect on value.

Changes in cap rate, with the same NOI

A change in cap rate with the same net operating income dramatically changes the value. The higher the cap rate, the lower the value; the lower the cap rate, the higher the perceived value.

∆ NOI and ∆ Value

You can also use the cap rate formula to decide if you make a change in the operations of a particular facility or particular commercial office building or particular multi-family. If you change the net operating income, given that the cap rate stays the same, what’s going to happen to that value? Let’s take an example.

Let’s say you have a 100-unit apartment building and you change the rent just merely $10 per unit per month. That works out to about $12,000 per year. Let’s say that the going cap rate for that kind of
building is 5 percent. That changed the value for a $10 rent change for 100 units by $240,000. That’s a very significant leverage effect that occurs because of this division by cap rate.

Slight change in NOI can have a disproportionate effect

Any slight change in net operating income has a disproportionate effect and it’s in the same direction as the value. In a low cap rate environment – i.e., if the cap rate’s about 2 percent – a $1,000 change results in a $50,000 value change. In a high cap rate environment, so let’s say 10 percent, a $1,000 change in net operating income only results in a $10,000 value change. Why is this relevant? This
is relevant because there’s certain markets, such as in California and other places that are relatively mature, like New York, that are very low cap rate environments for the same asset class as would be compared in the Midwest.

You would think because the cap rate is higher, you’re getting better bang for your buck, but that’s not necessarily true. In a low cap rate environment, a smaller change in net operating income drives a
greater value change. This is very important because you can make money whether the cap rate is high or low. It’s really a derivative of net operating income. Keep in mind that cap rates are an explanation of risk, so if the cap rate is super high for a particular asset group and in a particular city, that just might be because that’s a very high-risk area or a very high-risk asset.

Is it really that simple?

No. Cap rates are an artifice. They’re a calculation; they’re a derivative; they’re not real. Cap rates are looking at your back or rearview mirror trying to figure out where you’re going to get to. Cap rates are a translation of existing market behavior into a number that allows a comparison between asset groups or between demographics. Cap rate is an explanation of market sentiment, and it doesn’t mean much more than that. It’s like a numerical pain scale. One person’s pain might be an eight, another person’s pain might be a two, another person’s pain might be a three. It’s a scale and it’s highly subjective.

We objectify it by putting the formula in of essentially net operating income divided by value equals cap rate, but it doesn’t mean much – it’s looking at it backwards. Cap rate is a measure of forward-looking financial safety and
wealth preservation. It’s really a marker for potential market risk in a particular environment. You should never be lulled into a sense of safety by looking at a cap rate.

The cap rate is often used by brokers to obscure the real facts, and it confuses the individual investor. You have to remember that real estate is a hyper-local environment and cap rates are typically regional. They’re usually citywide.
Nobody really defines a cap rate for a neighborhood or a three-block area. I know that in the city that I live in, if I literally drive 250 feet from one residence to another residence or one street to another street, I can go from a war zone into some of the most expensive areas in the city, so the hyper-locality of real estate is not explained by cap rates and it’s very easy to confuse.

You can make money whether your cap rate is highor low.

It’s really the property that matters. It’s the management and what the management does with the net operating income. The hyper-local environment determines the value of that particular property, and the time horizon in which you’re going to hold property. The cap rate is really a look at supply and demand and risk. If the demographics are declining for that area—i.e. people are leaving the city – you can expect that the cap rates would go up because the risk goes up. It’s proportional to the risk. Keep in mind the cap rates do reflect the net operating income, so if you have a low cap rate and a high-interest rate, you’re going to find a very tough time financing a particular property because your net operating income may not be sufficient to pay for the debt service.

We search for value-added real estate for our passive commercial real estate partners and we actively manage that investment long term for a successful exit. We are Red Pill Kapital.
Find us at Redpillkapital.com